THE IMMIGRANT | SID HAMEED | A TRUE STORY OF SUCCESS | KASHMIR PAKISTAN|

THE IMMIGRANT | SID HAMEED | A TRUE STORY OF SUCCESS | KASHMIR PAKISTAN|


(upbeat pop music) (mouse clicks) (bell rings) (upbeat music) – All right, then we gonna go
sell a bone density scanner, how ’bout that? Wanna do that? – No. Hey Dad, I’m goin’ pro! Ah ha, I’m goin’ pro! – Whoa ho! Okay. Yeah, I don’t know, you know, you’ll probably be about as good as I was. That’s kind of the way it works, you know, and I was below average. You know, so, whoa! So, you’ll probably ultimately
rank somewhere around there, you know, so, really, you’ll
excel at a lot of things, just not this. So, I don’t want you out here
shooting this ball around all day and night. Aright? – Aright. – Okay? Now, go ahead. (sad music) Hey. Don’t ever let somebody tell
you you can’t do something. Not even me. All right? – All right. – You got a dream, you got to protect it. People can’t do somethin’ themselves, they want to tell you you can’t do it. If you want something, go get it! Period. Let’s go. – Dad! (inspirational music) – My name is Asad Hameed, and, here, they call me Sid, Sid Hameed. And, I’m 52 years old, and been in America for 40 years. I’m married. I’ve been married for about 13 years, and I got three dogs. And I live here in Prince George’s County, in Bowie, Maryland. Well, when I was growing up, I actually grew up in the mountains of Afghanistan and Pakistan, in a little area there
called Kashmir area. In a tribe called Karachis. So, when we grew up,
there was a war going on between India and Pakistan. So, I didn’t know what I wanted to be. I didn’t know if I was gonna be alive. But, so, what I was focused
on was just being alive. And, so, we used to go underground
when the tanks would come and the soldiers would
come fighting and stuff, and we would hide, you know, underground, for, like two, three days, four
days, until they went away. Yeah, I grew up with a lot of dead bodies. And, we had to, you know,
burn the dead bodies. Kids and old people, because of the smell, and the
bugs, and the crows and stuff. So. (mouse click) (ominous music) – [Narrator] Two months after
the India-Pakistan partition, Kashmir remained independent. What is the Kashmir conflict all about? In 1947, the countries
of India and Pakistan came into existence. The partition decided
the fate of millions, as various state rulers had to choose which country they would belong to. But the people of Kashmir
faced an uncertain future. Maharaja Hari Singh, the Hindu ruler of Muslim-majority Kahsmir, managed to keep the region
independent for two months. He did this by signing a standstill agreement with Pakistan and sending a similar agreement to India, which favored continuing discussions. But that changed in October 1947, when the Maharaja confiscated
armaments from Muslims, who were formerly conscripted
into the British Army. The weapons were distributed to local Hindu village defense forces and this provoked an uprising, supported by the Pashtun
tribesmen from Pakistan. The tribesmen were acting
without Pakistani approval. The Maharaja sought military
assistance from India, but India’s governor-general contended that it would be dangerous to send troops to a neutral state, unless Kashmir first
offered to accede to it. To suppress the uprising, the Hindu ruler’s army, along with the RSS, the
Hindu extremist organization, organized a pogrom
against Muslims in Jammu. There’s a dispute over
the number of Muslims that were massacred, and could be anywhere between 20,000 to over 100,000. This massacre was part
of a widespread violence in the subcontinent, in which, reportedly, over 20,000 Hindus and Sikhs were also killed. The Hindu ruler signed
a temporary arrangement, ceding Kashmir to India
on October the 26th. Pakistan disputed the
Maharaja’s accession, claiming that he had no right to sign an agreement with India, when a standstill agreement with Pakistan was still in force. On October 27, 1947, Indian
troops landed in Kashmir to fight the rebel forces
and the Pashtun tribesmen. This led to the first India Pakistan war. During the war, India’s
then prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, promised a referendum. – [Narrator] “The fate
of the State of Jammu “and Kashir is ultimately
to be decided by the people. “The pledge we have given, “not only to people of Kashmir, “but also to the world. “We will not and cannot back out of it.” – [Narrator] A little
over two months later, India referred the dispute
to the United Nations. A resolution was passed
on August 13, 1948, asking both nations to
withdraw their forces. Once that happened, a
referendum was to be held, allowing the people of Kashmir to decide their political future. But troops were never withdrawn, and the referendum never happened. On January 1, 1949, a
ceasefire was agreed upon, and Kashmir became a disputed territory. The ceasefire line became
the de facto border, splitting Kashmir in two. Over the next 70 years, India and Pakistan fought three wars over Kashmir, making it the most
militarized zone in the world. In India-administered Kashmir alone, India maintains around 600,000 troops, who have committed human rights violations like, rape, torture and
enforced disappearances, which still continue today. The number of people killed in Kashmir are estimated to be
from 50,000 to 100,000. Pakistan also maintained
a heavy military presence in the part of Kashmir
that it administers. A report by Human Rights Watch describes Pakistan-administered
Kashmir as, “A land of restrictions
on political rights “and civil liberties.” A poll published by
think-tank Chatham House stated that, “Nearly half of the people “living in Indian and
Pakistani parts of Kashmir “want their disputed state to become “an independent country.” (inspirational music) – Being here in America,
and changing my life, you know, and seeing another world. So, I appreciate everything, and I’m very grateful for everything. So, when I got to this
country and stuff like that, you know, I worked with
my hands, all right? So didn’t speak a lot of English, and I didn’t read and write. So I got into construction. So, I got into construction
at a young age, and I just started to learn and things. And, you know, I started with brick, doing brick patios, concrete sidewalks. Brick homes, and things like that, with some of the brick builders. I was a labor guy, you know, getting like $2.50, $3.50 an hour is what I was getting paid. So, I did that for years, but then I kept learning about drywall, electrical, and plumbing, and I’m seeing houses being built, like, going up in a process, in a system. And, you know, I always
knew that real estate is a place that, you know, you could get your freedom,
and get your time back. So, I just kept, you know, learning more about construction. And construction is the foundation, you know, for all real estate. And, I don’t know, I just got good at it, and just kept learning and meeting people, and branching out and networking, and then, eventually I bought
a property with my family. And then, we bought another
one, and another one and we ended up, over 30-something years, having over 120-some properties. You know, you got a department buildings, and self-storage and different things like that. But, it all started just by doing. And I believe in, you know, just doing. You just gotta do. And I learned by doing. I’m not a big, I don’t learn by books. I never really, I didn’t
finish high school, and didn’t go to college. Just stayed focused on hard work, and stayed focused on just doing, and just executing, and, you know, learning by failing. So, a lot of times when you fail, that’s a good thing, because, you know, you’re able to stretch, and you’re able to grow, and you’re going into
unrecognized territories. So, I failed a lot, but I also had a lot of success. So, failing can allow you to grow, and allow you to stretch. So, you know, I’ve had my ups and downs. Lost millions of dollars,
a couple of times, when the market crashed,
in the stock market, as well as the housing market. But, you know, I just get better, and stay focused, and sharpen my skills, create better relationships. I create better systems, create better processes, have more accountability, on a weekly basis, monthly basis, on a daily basis. And be very targeted and
focused with my energy. So, energy has to be
very clear and focused, in terms of what your end goal is. And, so, I’ve gotten into the habit of working backwards, you know, reverse engineering everything. If I know that I’m trying
to make a million dollars in the next six months, but what do I need to
do to make that happen, Working backwards. So, if I know I got
86,000 seconds in a day, how do I utilize my time to, you know, achieve my goals? How many sales calls I gotta make? How many appointments I gotta go out to? What kind of networking
events that I need to attend? So, it’s a lot that
goes into having a goal, but then also executing on that goal, with a very clear path, and a very clear guidance and direction. (inspirational music) (Upbeat pop music) (mouse clicks) (bell rings)

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