Judo Throws in MMA – A study of Karo Parisyan

Judo Throws in MMA – A study of Karo Parisyan


Karo “The Heat” Parisyan is an Armenian
born mixed martial artist who moved to America at the age of six and began
training judo at the age of nine and was competing in freestyle fighting against
fully grown adults when he was only fourteen years of age. He was trained by
the legendary Gokor Chivichyan and “Judo” Gene LeBell at the Hayastan
academy where he also learned the Hayastan grappling system. He was a
ferocious competitor and became a ten time Junior national judo champion a
four-time International judo champion and had faced the likes of Sean Sherk
Antonio McKee and Jason “Mayhem” Miller in MMA and was focusing on the 2004 Olympic
Judo trials before he got the call-up from the UFC. In this study we will list
the Judo techniques that Karo utilized during his MMA career. We will start with
the Ippon Seoi Nage, the one-armed shoulder throw technique where both
hands are used on one arm of the opponents as they are loaded onto the
back lifted and thrown over the shoulder. Seoi otoshi or shoulder drop, it’s a hand
technique where the opponents loaded onto the back and pulled straight down
over the shoulder and thrown while you drop both knees to the mat. the Harai goshi or sweeping hip throw is a
hip technique where the opponent’s balance is moved in a forward direction
and your hip is turned and leg extended placing the back of your thigh against
the front of the opponent’s and as you continue pulling them forward this is
used to sweep their legs out from underneath them in a sudden motion. Osotogari or major outer reaping is a leg throw performed by stepping outside the
leg of your opponent and cutting down on the back of their leg taking it out from
underneath them. Although in practice when used by Karo in the UFC it often
ended up looking more like a Harai goshi when finished due to the movements of
the opponent when being thrown. The Ashi guruma or leg wheel consists of placing your leg against the opponent’s leg between
his knee and shin and then using the rotation of your arms and body to throw
the opponent down with an instantaneous twisting motion. The Uchi mata or inner
thigh reaping throw is a leg technique that consists of off balancing the
opponent diagonally towards you then rotating your body and placing the back
of your thigh between the opponent’s legs and swinging upwards in a sudden
motion to execute the throw, an excellent sense of timing is required to achieve
this throw and it is one that Karo has often favored using in competition. And here you can see Karo using this
throw while simultaneously working towards an Ude Garami grip on his
opponent. The Ude Garami, Kimura or double wrist lock was an attack that was also often favored by Karo. With the use of the Kimura grip these throws turn into
variations of Makikomis or wrap around throws like the Osoto makikomi or
large outside wrap around throw which begins as an Osotogari with your leg
cutting down on the opponent’s leg but then you wrap around your opponent’s
body and fall down with them. Or the Harai makikomi, a hip sweep wrap around
throw which begins as a Harai goshi by bringing the opponent on to the hip
and twisting at the waist to flip the opponent over while also using the
Kimura grip to wrap them around your own body and fall to the mat with them. These
throws are classed as side sacrifice techniques and often finish with the
opponent on your back but as Karo would hold onto the Kimura
grip he could remain on the offensive. Another use of the Kimura is with the
Hikikomi gaeshi or pulling in sacrifice throw, which consists of
destabilizing the opponent in the forward direction and then inserting the
instep of your foot between the opponent’s leg in the crook of their
knee while dropping onto your back and throwing them over your own head after
which you can continue attacking with the Kimura from the top position. The
Kouchi gari or small inner reaping that consists of off balancing the opponent
by pushing them and reaping their heel in a decisive scooping motion and the
Kosoto gari which is a small outer reap which also consists of scooping the
opponent’s leg sending them to the mat. The Ōuchi gari or large inner reap
which is executed by moving straight into the opponent’s chest and then
performing a leg reap from the inner side by swinging the reaping foot in a half
circle in order to spread the opponent’s legs destabilize their balance and throw
them onto their back. The Kosoto gake or small outer hook
consists of driving towards the opponent and placing a foot behind them, then
after hooking the leg you can either lift and scoop the leg
out or trap the leg and lean on them until they fall to the mat. The Kuchiki taoshi or one hand drop consists of grabbing one of the opponent’s legs and
then pushing and running them down to the mat. This is often performed by Karo
off of caught kicks. And the Kibisu gaeshi or heel trip which consists of
grabbing the opponent’s heel with one hand and then pushing the opponent over
onto their back where they land on the spot. This is in contrast to the Kuchiki taoshi where they are pushed and run backwards. And the Morote gari or
two hands reap which is performed by grabbing both of the opponent’s legs
with both of your arms while driving forward and throwing them onto their
back this technique is the Judo version of the wrestlers double leg takedown. A
Sukui Nage or scooping throw is executed when during a Morote gari,
Karo scoops or lifts the opponent fully off the ground and slams them onto
the mat. In MMA this was often performed by him when pressed against the fence. “The Pioneer”: While spending most of his career
training at Hayastan Academy with Gokor Chivichyan He also spent time at
Team Punishment, training with Neal Melanson and at Xtreme Couture and
during his time competing in mixed martial arts Kara became the WEC
welterweight champion, the UFC welterweight number one contender, a
Bellator veteran and winner of the 2006 fight of the year with Diego Sanchez.
Although Judokas were fighting MMA in Japan at the time when Karo began
fighting in the UFC Judo was severely underrepresented and somewhat dismissed
by North American fans as a traditional martial art that may not hold any value
for the future of freestyle fighting. But when Karo began to literally throw
opponents on their heads he certainly changed that opinion. He
paved the way for countless other Judokas in the UFC, gaining respect for the
art by successfully adapting it and showcasing its effectiveness under the
mixed martial arts rule set. And that concludes our look at the use of judo in
MMA through the lens of the career and legacy of Karo Parisyan. Please subscribe
to the channel and like and comment on the video down below. Please check out my website at sonnybrown.net and follow me on Facebook and Twitter (@sonnybrown). Peace!

Author:

100 thoughts on “Judo Throws in MMA – A study of Karo Parisyan”

  • You have produced one of the best Judo-centered videos I have EVER seen (and I've seen a lot). Wow- just wow. I am blown away. A million thank you's my man.

  • Judo doesn’t work that well in MMA without wrestling, and a learning period to adapt judo skills. There is actually quite a large amount of judoka in MMA today, but you see very few people being thrown like Karo. One of the few was Ronda Rousey, who like Karo, went to Gokor or help adapt her Judo to wrestling without the judogi. Judo is still sadly by and large an untapped resource for MMA.

  • Dallas DautermanDallas says:

    Always admired Caro's skill. Very good instructional video! Back in the '70's,(yes, I'm old), we used variations of some of those techniques in high school & college wrestling, since my coach& my dad both had wrestling& judo backgrounds. Good job!

  • john hershberger says:

    i used to get excited to hear of a fight card with Parisyan on it. I saw him flip a guy that was trying to get his back while Karo was sitting down. No kidding, Karo sitting, flipped a a guy over his shoulder onto his head. Crazy good. what a huge loss.

  • If Jigoro wanst so aimed at politics, and spreaded just like Conde Koma, Judo would be the most powerful and knowledged grappling art, not jiu-jitsu nowadays.

  • Interesting video. Shows Judo moves seen in demo's never look as clean in practice (e.g. MMA). But IS used in MMA…sometimes.

    Interesting Aikido isn't used. Karate has been. No Kung Fu (Chinese).

  • Sam Smorcington says:

    Karo really was one of those rare fighters that came in a master of a very specific discipline. Amazing to watch. I really wish he wasn't such a horrible person outside the ring so I could be a bigger fan of his though.

  • I love seeing high level wrestling and judo in mma! I'm a striker myself, but I don't like when mma becomes kickboxing. Like, it's okay to be a striker, but don't do it lazily. Lot's of guys now just strike because they know they're opponent will only strike as well, and they both pass up ground opportunities, and likely both know minimal amount of highly defensive BJJ in order to stall back to standing. I love, however, watching people ragdoll they're opponent around. Good standing grapplers look seemingly unstoppable, and it's a treat to watch. Besides, it's always fun to see people mix things up, that was the original point of the sport, and it's fun to see it come back to that once again. That's one reason I like watching people from specific mma style, or arts. Like combat sambo, Kudo, shoot, and such. They bring a slightly different dynamic than most american mma, and it changes things up.

  • Beautiful stuff!
    Read all the comments
    before I comment..
    All you haters of karate
    and tae Kwan Do, y'all
    Must have had some
    Fake instructors
    I know for a fact
    Tae Kwan Do ain't
    Just about kicking.
    The master of
    TKD taught kung fu,
    Boxing. Judo, akijitsu.
    Shotokan, and sanchin,
    and no staff.
    My Kwan hang num
    Even took us to
    archery.
    Koreans the BEST.

  • I've never study Judo in a dojo, but I was taught a few techniques as a kid that stuck with me and I've used them in real-world self-defense situations to great effect.
    In my opinion, and from my experience. Judo is an excellent real-world defensive martial art.
    I can't fathom how anyone could say "Judo has no future" or that "it has no place in MMA".
    It might not be the flashiest martial art out there, but as far as my mileage has shown it can be effective.

  • From what i see hear judo is nothing like jui jitsui ive never seen throws like that in ju jitsui ive seen more similar stuff in my high school wrestling than in ju jitsui

  • Karo Parisyan and his judo throws were THE SHIT back in the day. Such a useful skill as a weapon or shield. I'd be watching with people less familiar with Karo's skills and I'd call it out before it happened saying "watch this flabby guy he's about to slam this ripped guy on his fucking head and tap him out".

  • Why do most judo fighters in MMA also do Sambo or BJJ? I personally think IJF has too many limitations but that's not an excuse as you could learn judo at a non-IJF club or at an MMA gym

  • "My Judo throws are the best 🥋, best throws 🤼 in the world, all the other throws are done by little girls." – Karo Parisiyan 🇦🇲🇦🇲

  • I'm 6'5 225 with long limbs. I constantly bait under hooks and use overhook uchi mata. If the guy can withstand the throw and post a hand, I get guillotine squaring back up while his posture is broke.

    No gi judo is incredible for MMA and self defense in general

    No better way to win a fight than get top position.

  • This weekend I Had a bjj tournament, expert division. No gi, submission only. A Kimura grip sumi Gaeshi, one of karos favorites, won my final match for me

  • It may sound silly…but lately I have been lazy on training my Takedowns and Throws, but watching this video has helped me a lot on forcing myself to train, use and drill them, Karo was one of my favourites to watch and watching a study on him helped me a lot, thank you, keep up the awesome work!!

  • Wait guys go on this dudes channel. This guy is actually a fucking fighter not just some armchair wanker. Sonny brown ain't no bitch.

  • It took me getting thrown once to respect Judo. Legit black belt flipped me on top of my head. Had a concussion and was blurry on one eye. In the streets that would have had me drinking food from a straw while hoping somebody will be there to wipe me for the rest of my life. Of all the bjj guys, judo guys and wrestlers I rolled with, I never experienced a legit black belt judoka until then. He was like a tree, so hard to move, the speed was blinding, and the explosiveness of the throw was unreal to me at the time. I learned though.

    This is similar to the first time I was leg kicked by a TKD black belt. If this was in the streets, when my leg was blasted out from under me, and I was in shock for a split second, a follow up kick to my face would have ended me.

    Don't disrespect an art. All it takes is one legit practitioner to end you. If they aren't disciplined enough to stop when they've clearly won, they just might kick your head off. Or straight drop you on your head.

    I'm thankful my sparring partners didn't hurt me too bad.

    Also: when I was kicked in the leg at 17 years old (20 years ago) it was in my friends kung fu class. I made fun of him for wasting his time in kung fu, and told him come box with me, then he invited me to class to spar. I could box better than all of them, but it didn't matter when we sparred second rotation, I didn't know he green lighted me after our first round of sparring. Only one person took advantage of that and that's where I got leg kicked. Don't be arrogant, my friends. If you are, I hope you are shown mercy, and are given a chance to learn from your mistakes.

  • ربطة نعناع says:

    Nothing will Top Uchi Mata for me! The ippon from an Uchi Mata is so satisfying especially when it's perfectly done … You can do many variations from that technique, and it's very hard to defend against.
    Ne Waza is fun too!

  • I had the pleasure earlier today to attend Karo's Seminar in Vegas at Freestyle MMA. Super funny and down to earth. He's like a comedian who can kill you.

  • If your attacker has gotten that close to you in a street fight, assuming your the smaller, weaker, lighter & older (as in the wrong side of 40/50 older) than you're already in deep trouble. I'd totally forget about throws (unless your attacker absolutely hands one to you!) and instead think of Vale Tudo "Anything Goes" responses. Groin/Eyes, actually pretty much EVERYTHING on the head makes a good target, or use that oblique kick/"teep" to the thigh & if you're lucky enough to hit his knee cap, so much the better. A friend of mine got into a street (actually an apt lobby) fight on New Years Eve, when some miscreant (don't think he was drunk) wanted to be let into the apt my friend was also going into or perhaps out of … I can't recall. I think they were approx. the same size. Long story short, my friend refused to open the door and next thing he knew the miscreant took a swing at him. It didn't land flush though and before he knew it they were on the ground scrambling as one tried to beat the other in getting up. Finally while my friend was on the ground, the guy open the outer door and made a run for it. My friend rose and discovered a silvery thin object on the ground. Yes, it was a straight edged razor the guy had hidden somewhere on himself and was going for when they hit the floor. If my friend had continued to grapple with him, he'd probably never have seen the razor before it slashed him, and even if it didn't get his throat, good luck trying to find a NYC taxi on New Years Eve!!The motto of this story, & the reason I've never liked Judo or BJJ as a self-defense should hopefully be clear by now (and no, please don't bombard me with your real life stories, I don't know you, I don't know if you're telling me the truth, and because most street fights don't end this way & grappling takes longer to learn & harder to execute & was never made as a self defense, etc, I've heard all you BJJ/Judo true believers &  I'm unimpressed) . Don't go to the ground unless you absolutely have to! Use your legs & arms to strike whatever vulnerable point you can which will cause the most damage, and use your elbows & knees & lastly your own forehead if need be at very close quarters to inflict even more damage, and don't run away until he's been totally incapacitated or KO'ed and no longer a possible threat. Last (controversial) suggestion: I'd try and get his wallet &/or keys, assuming he has them. This way, you can identify your attacker as soon as you get to safety & if you seek legal counsel OR go to the cops (your call) they'll know exactly who this bastard was.

  • dave johnson1 second agoIf your attacker has gotten that close to you in a street fight, assuming your the smaller, weaker, lighter & older (as in the wrong side of 40/50 older) than you're already in deep trouble. I'd totally forget about throws (unless your attacker absolutely hands one to you!) and instead think of Vale Tudo "Anything Goes" responses. Groin/Eyes, actually pretty much EVERYTHING on the head makes a good target, or use that oblique kick/"teep" to the thigh & if you're lucky enough to hit his knee cap, so much the better. A friend of mine got into a street (actually an apt lobby) fight on New Years Eve, when some miscreant (don't think he was drunk) wanted to be let into the apt my friend was also going into or perhaps out of … I can't recall.                                                                                                                                                                                        I think they were approx. the same size. Long story short, my friend refused to open the door and next thing he knew the miscreant took a swing at him. It didn't land flush though and before he knew it they were on the ground scrambling as one tried to beat the other in getting up. Finally while my friend was on the ground, the guy open the outer door and made a run for it. My friend rose and discovered a silvery thin object on the ground. Yes, it was a straight edged razor the guy had hidden somewhere on himself and was going for when they hit the      floor.                                                                                                                                                                                         If my friend had continued to grapple with him, he'd probably never have seen the razor before it slashed him, and even if it didn't get his throat, good luck trying to find a NYC taxi on New Years Eve!The motto of this story, & the reason I've never liked Judo or BJJ as a self-defense should hopefully be clear by now (and no, please don't bombard me with your real life stories, I don't know you, I don't know if you're telling me the truth, and because most street fights don't end this way & grappling takes longer to learn & harder to execute & was never made as a self defense, etc, I've heard all you BJJ/Judo true believers &  I'm unimpressed) .                                                                                                                                                                                 Don't go to the ground unless you absolutely have to! Use your legs & arms to strike whatever vulnerable point you can which will cause the most damage, and use your elbows & knees & lastly your own forehead if need be at very close quarters to inflict even more damage, and don't run away until he's been totally incapacitated or KO'ed and no longer a possible threat. Last (controversial) suggestion: I'd try and get his wallet &/or keys, assuming he has them. This way, you can identify your attacker as soon as you get to safety & if you seek legal counsel OR go to the cops (your call) they'll know exactly who this bastard was.

  • Un terms of a STREET FIGHT, The second agoIf your attacker has gotten that close to you in a street fight, assuming you are the smaller, weaker, lighter & older (as in the wrong side of 40/50 older) than you're already in deep trouble. I'd totally forget about throws (unless your attacker absolutely hands one to you!) and instead think of Vale Tudo "Anything Goes" responses:                                                                                                                                                        Groin/Eyes, actually pretty much EVERYTHING on the head makes a good target, or use that oblique kick/"teep" to the thigh & if you're lucky enough to hit his knee cap, so much the better. A friend of mine got into a street (actually an apt lobby) fight on New Years Eve, when some miscreant (don't think he was drunk) wanted to be let into the apt my friend was also going into or perhaps out of … I can't recall.                                                                                                                                                                                        I think they were approx. the same size. Long story short, my friend refused to open the door and next thing he knew the miscreant took a swing at him. It didn't land flush though and before he knew it they were on the ground scrambling as one tried to beat the other in getting up. Finally while my friend was on the ground, the guy open the outer door and made a run for it. My friend rose and discovered a silvery thin object on the ground. Yes, it was a straight edged razor the guy had hidden somewhere on himself and was going for when they hit the      floor.                                                                                                                                                                                         If my friend had continued to grapple with him, he'd probably never have seen the razor before it slashed him, and even if it didn't get his throat, good luck trying to find a NYC taxi on New Years Eve!The motto of this story, & the reason I've never liked Judo or BJJ as a self-defense should hopefully be clear by now (and no, please don't bombard me with your real life stories, I don't know you, I don't know if you're telling me the truth, and because most street fights don't end this way & grappling takes longer to learn & harder to execute & was never made as a self defense, etc, I've heard all you BJJ/Judo true believers &  I'm unimpressed) .                                                                                                                                                                                 Don't go to the ground unless you absolutely have to! Use your legs & arms to strike whatever vulnerable point you can which will cause the most damage, and use your elbows & knees & lastly your own forehead if need be at very close quarters to inflict even more damage, and don't run away until he's been totally incapacitated or KO'ed and no longer a possible threat. Last (controversial) suggestion: I'd try and get his wallet &/or keys, assuming he has them. This way, you can identify your attacker as soon as you get to safety & if you seek legal counsel OR go to the cops (your call) they'll know exactly who this bastard was

  • dave johnson says:

    The reason Police use stand-up Grappling techniques is purely for LEGAL reasons, NOT effectiveness. Police in many communities are NOT allowed to strike a suspect! So that's the reason they are reduced to inferior grappling. That came about because of cases long ago where punches led to concussions, and the suspect falling to the concrete, hitting their heads, and in some cases, getting brain hemorrhaging & bleeding to death. So Grappling was a response to a LEGAL problem/dilemma. It was NEVER the ideal self-defense response.

  • oliver closehoff says:

    idk if karo would have been near as successful with those throws vs guys today at ufc level guys are still hitting uchi matas and harai goshi throws especially as single leg counters but those drop seio nages yeah idk

  • brendan flanagan says:

    One of the most exciting fighters ever in the UFC. I watched his fights and in the clinch you were in trouble. He always had a plan and next thing you know your on the mat defending. People talk about Rhonda Rousey judo which is really good but this guy is just nasty.

  • For years since i was a young teen I tried to sign up to a judo class but for a lot of reasons I didn't (also, here in Mexico is hard to find a good school). It so sad beacuse I'm in an age which I can be competing in high level. But I know that someday I'm gonna try it

  • it was so cool to see him pull off these awesome Judo moves. I loved watching him back in the day. What a great grappler. And without a GI!

  • Need advice I do k1ckboxing and want to add grappling I have two options in my area judo and freestyle wrestling which each have a class once a week do I do one or both

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *