How to Do Gokyo | Aikido Lessons

How to Do Gokyo | Aikido Lessons


Gokyo is the fifth technique in the series
of techniques the Sensei established. And it is primarily used in removing a knife,
or a Tonto, from your partner’s hand. But we’ll demonstrate it real briefly. Let’s start with the Shomenuchi. So normally when we start Shomenuchi, in this
whole series we begin from Ikkyo. Things change a little bit at Gokyo. Normally we would have our hand on top, and
rotate it over, so that I’m grabbing his wrist from the top here, if we were to execute Ikkyo. For Gokyo, both hands come up underneath. As I move away I’m going to grab his wrist
from underneath, and lock the elbow. And move away from my partner, shoulder goes
down. Knee closest to my partner is down. And I’m going to use the elbow to lift. Hand slides underneath the elbow, and you
want to put pressure down on the elbow. With a pin. So Gokyo. Shomenuchi. Up. Turn. You’ve got the hand from underneath and the
elbow is locked. Straight down on top of the shoulder, Again,
knee that is closest to your partner is up. Lift the elbow. I’m going to use my hand to push my partner’s
hand underneath the elbow, and apply pressure. You’ll notice that it’s almost impossible
for my partner to make a fist in this position. Which is exactly why it works very well with
the Tonto. So from that same attack overhand, the Shomenuchi,
one of the reasons I don’t want to put my hand here, is if the blade were to cut down
and make contact with my wrist. That’s why I’m going to come from underneath,
lock the elbow and take it away from my partner’s body, and drop. When it’s out, slide the Tonto underneath,
and the hand will pop open. It’s very difficult to keep a fist in this
position. You can also see this from Yokomenuchi. Open, reach across and take the wrist, turn
the hips, create the pin, and take the knife. Alright? Gokyo. Number five.

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31 thoughts on “How to Do Gokyo | Aikido Lessons”

  • To be fair, you should never try to learn any martial art or self defence from videos on the internet, you should go to a dojo or a gym

  • Khampee Theppornprapakorn says:

    I think video should be short sharp simple as it's for a quick demonstration.
    If you want to train I don't think just watching the video is enough.
    You will need an instructor to guide you through and some movement are quite complex.

    Incorrect execution of technique can do more harm than good, both for you and your partner.
    Most cases, it wont' even work at all.

  • nobody is EVER gonna attack you with a knife like that, its an out dated practice….. a club yes a bottle yes a knife ???? NO! i like the principles of aikido but as a jujitska i find the the methods of attack unrealistic.

  • you might enjoy the older styles of aikido more (pre WW2) which use randorifree sparring and a broader range of attacks. I know Yoseikan is like that and I hear Yoshinkan and Tomiki is too.

  • I disagree i study all forms of martial arts. I think videos are a great way to supplement and improve ones knowledge of all arts. I agree though one should always practice with a training partner at a gym or dogo. Some material you must feel how the technique works and can not learn simply by watching. I like learning from videos then going to my dojo and experimenting.

  • I think my comment was perhaps alittle limited. I entirely agree with you, infact, that tends to be what I do, I watch videos like this then go to my dojo to try them out but thats an enviroment that is safe and controlled, you have a sensei/instructor/sempai/whatever who can correct mistakes and misinterpratations. Just watching a video then trying it out on a friend, or thinking you are Steven Seagal is just folly, thats more what I meant.

  • Pragyan Bezbaruah says:

    i want to ask you something… real knife fights, as i think. wont happen like this… i mean , if i have a knife, i wont attack him in the head like this.. rather i would attack him on his stomach, and will take the knife from low to high to stab him on his stomach…and wont attack him from top to bottom on his head… is there any video on this?? if not, can you please upload one???? i would really appreciate your reply and a video upload on this.. 🙂
    btw i am really helpful on your training.

  • It is not supposed to "teach" people something new. If you want to learn this stuff without any background, find a physical place, not Youtube.

  • LOL, the whole sequence, including the finishing pin is called Gokyu. If you want to be anal retentive about the last part, you can call it gokyo saiwaza.

  • Indeed. These should not be taught by internet alone, a sensei (or at least sempai) should be present for new techniques. My fellow aikidokas and I use these videos as a memory jog or to take to the dojo and ask, "Sensei, I saw this, can we learn it today?" Not as an actual teacher.

    Goyko pins hurt really fast. And if someone resists as a 'does it really work,' measure, it's easy to accidentally hurt them. If you don't understand this video well, you don't know how to practice it safely.

  • The technique is gokyo.

    The pin is the gokyo pin.

    Gokyo literally means "5th technique" (go = 5 or 5th, kyo is technique).

  • You can't learn Aikido from a video.

    If you already have a decent understanding of Aikido, these videos might help you to improve (by showing you a different aspect of it).

    Find a good dojo and take some classes. And, really, go watch classes at several before you make a decision…there are many different styles.

    This is Aikikai, which is very similar to the style I started with. I find it a bit rough now, but the mechanics are a little more straightforward and practical.

  • cecilia crivelli says:

    thank u for showing this video and these techniches, it's really helpful for people like me who do not know anything about it. it can help us a lot in case of an attack, it's better to know than not to know, even if we just know the basics of aikido

  • @Pragyan there is an Aikido technique against a low stomach stab with a knife (which is not any different from chudan tsuki). The principle of course is to get out of the way whilst grabbing their wrist and perhaps do a kotegaeshi. To do that you have to do a tenkan (a pivotal turning movement) to get out of the way first. 

  • One thing I will humbly suggest is once the technique is applied , tori should block with his thumb uke´s wrist in order to block the knife in his hand which could be moved around and damage tori´s fingers

  • As a karateka, these tutotials is very useful for me.  In our dojo, our senior instructor had a Tomiki Aikido background.  Therefore, we have to learn and demonstrate Tomiki Knife Defense Techniques in order to pass the Shodan test.  We use many of these techniques, but I never knew the terminology until now.

    Domo Arigato Gozai Mashita!

  • TubersAndPotatoes says:

    For the Yokomen-uchi, can you use the Omotte instead of the Ura? I'm wondering about how the Nage's forward blocking hand makes contact with the Uke's knife holding hand (whether you make the contact at the Uke's wrist or the inside of the elbow), because the Nage is trying to avoid getting cut by the knife.

  • Good solid techniques. I've seen the y block demonstrated before in Tony Manord's combat jujitsu system. I'm very impressed.

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